We're never going to finish that bottle of Creme de VioletteIt all started when we saw this lovely cocktail cabinet in a vintage shop. I said we could only buy it if we actually used it for booze, and not to store the usual crap a family of four hides in their cupboards.

Deal struck, we brought it home and have since enjoyed mixing and drinking cocktails at the weekend. It’s been fun finding a collection of drinks we enjoy, but we have recipes in books, recipes on my Notes app and recipes squirrelled away on bits of paper. There has to be a better way – and this is it!

I put a Hyperpixel 4 from Pimoroni on top of a Raspberry Pi and wrote a Python program using Laura Sach’s guizero library. Guizero lets you create simple graphical environments, and even for a learner like me it’s very accessible with clear documentation and examples.

My code is here on Github. The functions at the top are called for each relevant PushButton press, and the stuff at the bottom is the nuts and bolts holding together the app layout. I wanted to use photos as the background to the recipes as much as possible, these are stored as .jpg files which are called to fore when you press the button for that drink. As I remember to take more photos of the cocktails before we slurp sip them I’ll add more pictures to the backgrounds. The Hyperpixel display is great: it’s clear, colourful and the touch works well, even with my tiny buttons. By default the “bottom” of the screen is where the power plugs into the Raspberry Pi, and as I want to hide the plug away behind my little kiosk I used Pimoroni’s simple instructions to rotate the display 180 degrees, which moves the power connector to the back.

The Hyperpixel4 is small; it’s just a shade larger than the Raspberry Pi itself, but crams in 800 x 480 pixels. Even so, every line you display counts. My app looked great on screen but the title bar was using vital space. Despite reading the guizero documentation I couldn’t work out a way to make the title bar disappear, so I tweeted Laura and was delighted when she replied with a solution for me. Simply put, guizero is a friendly wrapper for a more complex Python library called Tkinter, and you can use those methods to modify objects in guizero. It just took one line of code, which Laura included in her tweet, but it made all the difference to how my programme looks on the Hyperpixel.

Open with Python Launcher

I wrote this program entirely on my Mac – there’s no GPIO interaction, nothing requiring the Raspberry Pi hardware at all, so I wondered if I could also regularly use this on my Mac without having to launch it from Terminal. A quick Google search led me to this page where I found out that with Python 3 installed it’s easy to right-click on a Python file and choose Open With -> Python Launcher. I dragged the icon onto my Dock and it opens when I click on it – just like a real app! I changed the power off button to a quit button so I don’t keep shutting down my laptop, and now I can easily browse these cocktail recipes on my Mac or on my little touch screen Raspberry Pi kiosk.